There is so much news in the world of Biblical archaeology and the Holy Land, it is hard to keep up! That is why we offer the latest news from the lands of the Bible that will interest you the most.

Gospel of John Commentary: Who Wrote the Gospel of John and How Historical Is It?

The Gospels, the first four books of the New Testament, tell the story of the life of Jesus. Yet only one—the Gospel of John—claims to be an eyewitness account, the testimony of the unnamed “disciple whom Jesus loved.” (“This is the disciple who is testifying to these things and wrote ...

  • December 9, 2019

Antiquities Announces Discovery of 19 Stone Masses

This morning, the Ministry of Antiquities started the excavation work in a piece of land owned by a citizen near the Temple of God Ptah in the area of ​​Mait Rahina, who was arrested yesterday by the Tourism and Antiquities Police, dug into it and uncovered huge archaeological blocks submerged ...

  • December 9, 2019

Seth in the Bible

In the story of the first man and the first woman, we are intrigued by a character about whom we are told very little. Adam and Eve, we know. After all, they are our ancestors. Each one of us is their direct descendant. Scripture says so, and we are bound to ...

  • December 9, 2019

Shiloh Discovery Matches Biblical Altar

The Horns of an Altar Linked to Ancient Sacrifices As early as the third chapter of Genesis, the idea and language of sacrifice is introduced in the Bible. Now, horns from an altar matching the sacrificial system of ancient Israel have been discovered at the site of ancient Shiloh. This adds ...

  • December 7, 2019

Roman Empire not destroyed by plague after all, say historians

Three times the plague gripped the Old World, killing untold millions and devastating social and economic networks. Or so the story goes. Yet precious little evidence of profound devastation has been found for the first of these bouts — the so-called Justinian Plague, which began in Egypt in about 541, ...

  • December 7, 2019

Royal Statues Discovered in Matariya

The Egyptian-German joint archaeological mission working in Heliopolis temple in Matariya district discovered on Sunday remains of royal statues and a stone featuring inscriptions of King Ramesses II in front of god Ra-Horakhty. The archaeological mission also found a large wall of mud bricks dating back to the New Kingdom in ...

  • December 7, 2019

Hawass to Reveal How Tutankhamun Died

Egyptian archaeologist Dr. Zahi Hawass met a high-level British delegation in front of the Sphinx. The delegation included intellectuals, writers, university professors and public figures. Hawass assured the delegation that the Sphinx belongs to King Khafre, the founder of the Second Pyramid. Hawass stressed that the claims that say that there is a missing ...

  • December 7, 2019

Bible Scholar Brent Landau Asks “Who Were the Magi?”

Who were the magi, those gift-bearing wise men from the east who are so central to the traditional telling of the Christmas story? Bible scholar Brent Landau believes he has found at least one answer to this age-old question. The Bible tells us very little about the magi. Their story appears ...

  • December 7, 2019

Egyptian Archaeological Mission Finds Coins, Shabti Dolls in Damietta

The Egyptian archaeological mission working in Tel el-Deir archeological site in Damietta unearthed seven gold coins dating back to the Byzantine Empire and a collection of Shabti dolls with inscriptions of King Psamtik II. Head of the Ancient Egyptian Antiquities Sector Ayman Ashmawy said all the coins were minted by word ...

  • December 7, 2019

Asherah and the Asherim: Goddess or Cult Symbol?

Who is Asherah? Or, perhaps, what is asherah? The Hebrew means “happy” or “upright” and some suggest “(sacred) place.” The term appears 40 times in the Hebrew Bible, usually in conjunction with the definite article “the.” The definite article in Hebrew is similar to English in that personal names do ...

  • December 7, 2019